Choose to Protect

"Know your vaccine options so you can make a plan to help protect yourself and your loved ones from COVID this season.”

– Nicole Ari Parker

Actor, Mother and Business Owner

Download COVID Vaccine Guide

About Choose to Protect

The Choose to Protect campaign is a collaboration between Novavax, HealthyWomen and actor, mother and business owner Nicole Ari Parker to build awareness, educate and encourage individuals to learn about COVID vaccine options to help protect themselves and their families.

Understanding that women often play an important role when it comes to the health of their family, we partnered with HealthyWomen and The Harris Poll to conduct a survey among family decision-makers 45+. Our goal was to better understand their views about COVID vaccination, what could potentially motivate them to take action, as well as gaining a better understanding of the education gaps that our campaign could address.

Nicole Ari Parker

Actor, mother and business owner

Jose Torradas, MD

Emergency Medicine Physician and Co-Founder of Medicos Unidos, Inc.

Beth Battaglino, RN-C

CEO of HealthyWomen

Discover COVID Vaccine Options

Life’s full of choices. Vaccination helps make them possible. This fall and winter season, updated vaccine options are available, including protein-based and mRNA options.1

mRNA Vaccines

The mRNA vaccines contain a piece of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA).2 The mRNA provides instructions for your cells to produce a harmless piece of protein found on the SARS-CoV-2 virus, called the spike protein.2 After following the instructions, your body breaks down the mRNA and removes it as waste.2 Once your cells produce the spike protein, the immune system can recognize this protein as something that does not belong.2 The immune system then activates to remove the protein and to build memory cells that can recognize the protein in the future.2 If you are subsequently exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, your body’s immune system will recognize the spike protein and attack the virus.2

Protein Subunit Vaccine

Protein subunit vaccines contain a small harmless piece of the virus.2 This piece is a protein found on the SARS-CoV-2 virus called the spike protein.2 When the vaccine is injected into the muscle, the immune system can recognize this spike protein as something that does not belong.2 The immune system then activates to remove the protein and to build memory cells that can recognize the protein in the future.2 If you are subsequently exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, your body’s immune system can recognize the spike protein and attack the virus.2

Protein subunit vaccines may also sometimes contain an adjuvant.2 An adjuvant is an ingredient added to some vaccines to help enhance the immune response for the person being vaccinated.2

Choose to Protect Survey

So, what are people saying about COVID vaccination?

Novavax partnered with HealthyWomen and Harris Poll to conduct a survey among 1,005 adults aged 45+ who play a substantial role in healthcare decisions for their household and have received at least the primary COVID vaccine series.*

Adults aged 45-54 were most likely to say they are the primary healthcare decision-maker for someone else compared to older adults.

adults aged 45-54 consider themselves a primary healthcare decision-maker for someone else.

of women who consider themselves the primary healthcare decision-maker for someone else are making vaccine decisions for their elderly parents or relatives.

Over half of adults aged 45-54 said they feel pressure to stay knowledgeable about COVID vaccines because they make healthcare decisions for people other than themselves.

While COVID fatigue has been widely reported,3 adults 45+ still recognized the value of vaccines.

of adults believed vaccines are absolutely essential or very important for maintaining their health.

of adults believed vaccines are absolutely essential or very important for their ability to spend time with family.

of adults who said they are motivated to get vaccinated gave the following reasons: emergence of new variants (60%),4 increasing COVID cases in the U.S. (52%)5 or from wanting to have a less severe illness if they were to get COVID (51%).6

A significant portion of adults 45+ felt a duty to get the COVID vaccine for their loved ones and the betterment of society as a whole.

agreed that knowing their loved ones are vaccinated against COVID puts them at ease.

agreed that helping to protect high-risk people in our society is a key reason they choose to get vaccinated against COVID for themselves / their family.

agreed that being vaccinated against COVID gives them peace of mind when spending time with their family members, especially around the holidays.

Even though there is interest in learning more about COVID vaccines, there are still gaps in knowledge.

agreed it is important to have a range of COVID vaccine options for themselves and their family.

Only around 2 in 5 said they are highly knowledgeable about the science behind how different types of vaccines help to protect against COVID.

Familiarity with specific COVID vaccine types is limited, though highest for mRNA vaccines. Only 3 in 10 said that they are familiar with protein-based vaccines and only 1 in 10 are highly familiar.

COVID Information

Emerging COVID virus variants continue to pose a risk.7 Take action to help protect yourself and your loved ones from COVID this fall and winter season.

Although COVID is no longer considered a public health emergency, it remains an ongoing health concern for Americans.8

Vaccines help protect people from getting seriously ill, being hospitalized, and even dying from COVID.1 In fact, the CDC recommends individuals six months and older get an updated COVID vaccine.1 Staying up-to-date with COVID vaccines is especially important for the elderly and people with severe health conditions.9

You and your loved ones can help protect yourselves from COVID and the flu by getting vaccinated.10 Ask your healthcare provider about your vaccine options.

FAQS

So, what vaccine options are available for me and my loved ones?
You have choices.

When it comes to getting your COVID vaccine, there are different types of vaccines to choose from, a protein-based vaccine or mRNA vaccines.1

Should my loved ones and I get a COVID vaccine this fall and winter season?

Answer

The virus that causes COVID continues to change7 and may cause disruptions to our way of life. Getting vaccinated against COVID is one of the best ways to help protect yourself and loved ones.1 Ask your healthcare provider about your COVID vaccine options.

Who should get a COVID vaccine?

Answer

The CDC recommends everyone six months and older get an updated COVID vaccine.1 Staying up to date with COVID vaccines is especially important for the elderly and people with severe health conditions.9 Ask your healthcare provider about your COVID vaccine options.

When is the best time to get a COVID vaccine?

Answer

Vaccination remains an important tool to help protect against COVID.11 It’s important to speak with your healthcare provider to determine the best time to receive a COVID vaccine to help protect yourself this season.

Why is it important to stay up to date with a COVID vaccine?

Answer

COVID remains an ongoing health concern for Americans.8  

COVID vaccination helps protect people from getting seriously ill, being hospitalized, and even dying from COVID.1 Vaccines are especially important for populations like the elderly and those with weakened immune systems who are at an increased risk for severe outcomes from COVID.9

Can you choose a different type of vaccine if you've previously been vaccinated with another?

Answer

Your next COVID vaccine doesn’t have to be the same type as your last one.1 Talk to your healthcare provider about your COVID vaccine options.

If I already had COVID and recovered, do I still need to get a COVID vaccine?

Answer

According to the CDC, you should get a COVID vaccine even if you already had COVID.12 Talk to your healthcare provider about your COVID vaccine options.

Can I get my COVID and flu shots at the same time?

Answer

According to the CDC, there is no recommended waiting period between getting a COVID vaccine and the flu vaccine.10 Ask your healthcare provider about your COVID vaccine options. If you’re already planning to get a flu shot, you can also discuss how to add a COVID vaccine to your appointment.

What happens if the variant changes? Will I have to get another vaccine?

Answer

As of September 2023, public health officials have stated that they anticipate the updated 2023-2024 COVID vaccines will be better at fighting currently circulating variants.1 COVID vaccines may need to be updated as variants change.13 Talk to your healthcare provider about your COVID vaccine options.


For more information about COVID, please visit www.CDC.gov and speak with your healthcare provider about ways to help protect yourself and your loved ones.

What are some questions I should ask my healthcare provider about my COVID vaccine choices?

Answer

  • What are my COVID vaccine options?
  • If I already had COVID and recovered, do I still need to get a COVID vaccine?
  • Can I get my COVID and flu shots at the same time?
  • If I am immunocompromised and/or 65 years and older, are there any precautions I should consider before choosing a COVID vaccine?

The choice that shows them how much you really care.

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In The News

Videos and Downloaded/Shareable Graphics

Nicole Ari Parker

Actor, mother and business owner

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Jose Torradas, MD

Emergency Medicine Physician and Co-Founder of Medicos Unidos, Inc.

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Beth Battaglino, RN-C

CEO of HealthyWomen

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*The research was conducted online in the United States by The Harris Poll on behalf of Novavax and HealthyWomen among 1,005 U.S. adults aged 45+ who play a substantial role in healthcare decisions for their household and have received at least the primary COVID vaccine series. The survey was conducted September 7 – 14, 2023. Data are weighted where necessary by age, gender, race/ethnicity, region, education, marital status, household size, household income, and propensity to be online to bring them in line with their actual proportions in the population.  

Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in our surveys. The sampling precision of Harris online polls is measured by using a Bayesian credible interval. For this study, the sample data is accurate to within + 4.5 percentage points using a 95% confidence level. This credible interval will be wider among subsets of the surveyed population of interest. All sample surveys and polls, whether they use probability sampling, are subject to other multiple sources of error which are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including, but not limited to coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments.

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Stay Up to Date with COVID-19 Vaccines. Accessed October 9, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/stay-up-to-date.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Understanding How COVID-19 Vaccines Work. Accessed October 3, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines/how-they-work.html

3 Stamm, T.A., Partheymüller, J., Mosor, E. et al. Determinants of COVID-19 vaccine fatigue. Nat Med 29, 1164–1171 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1038/ s41591-023-02282-y

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. COVID-19: Variants of the Virus. Accessed October 23, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/variants/index.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. COVID Data Tracker. Accessed October 23, 2023. https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#trends_weeklyhospitaladmissions_select_00

6 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 5 Things You Should Know about COVID-19 Vaccines. Accessed October 23, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/respiratory-viruses/whats-new/5-things-you-should-know.html#:~:text=People%20vaccinated%20with%20Moderna's%20updated,illness%2C%20hospitalization%2C%20and%20death

7 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. SARS-CoV-2 Variant Classifications and Definitions. Accessed October 3, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/variants/variant-classifications.html

8 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. COVID-19 Surveillance After Expiration of the Public Health Emergency Declaration ― United States, May 11, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/72/wr/mm7219e1.htm?s_mm7219e1_w

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. COVID-19: People with Certain Medical Conditions. Accessed October 3, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-with-medical-conditions.html

10 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Getting a Flu Vaccine and a COVID-19 Vaccine at the Same Time. Accessed October 3, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/coadministration.htm

11 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 5 Reasons It Is Important for Adults to Get Vaccinated. Accessed October 3, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/adults/reasons-to-vaccinate.html

12 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 Vaccination. Accessed October 3, 2023. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/faq.html

13 FDA Takes Action on Updated mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines to Better Protect Against Currently Circulating Variants. U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Published September 11, 2023. Accessed October 19, 2023. https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-takes-action-updated-mrna-covid-19-vaccines-better-protect-against-currently-circulating

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